Congress

Posted by Kevin Stump on July 16, 2013
Photo credit: iStock

(New York City, NY) – Rates on subsidized Stafford student loans doubled on July 1st because Congress could not come up with an agreed upon solution. The House of Representatives passed a bad deal for students and the Senate passed no deal at all.

Sound familiar? That’s because it is. We had this fight just last year because the law that Congress passed in 2007 to incrementally lower interest rates on subsidized Stafford student loans — from 6.8% in 2008 down to 3.4% in 2011— was set to expire (and therefore double rates!) on July 1st of 2012.

Posted by Jeanne Zaino on June 25, 2013
Sentor Coburn. Image Credit: NY TImes

The American Political Science Association (APSA) recently hired lobbyists to advocate in favor of lifting restrictions on the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) funding of political science research. This is just one of the many tactics the organization has taken in response to the Continuing Appropriations Act of 2013 which was signed into law in March and included an amendment limiting funding for political research.

Posted by Jeanne Zaino on June 3, 2013
Teacher

A cautionary tale for the common core 

May is a month full of celebrations—everything from May Day and Cinco de Mayo to Mother's Day and Memorial Day. Largely forgotten in the cornucopia of May celebrations, however, is National Metric Week. From 1976 until 1984, the week of May 10 was National Metric Week.

Posted by Jeanne Zaino on May 20, 2013
Photo Credit: brigthstarusa1

This month, three major institutions -- the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Army and the New York State Assembly -- have become embroiled in controversies involving allegations of sexual assault and harassment from powerful individuals within their ranks.

Posted by David Laska on May 14, 2013
Casino

New York needs jobs. But New York has a Governor with neither the experience nor the will to do what’s necessary to create jobs.

You might not know it from listening to his sleek, Robert DeNiro-narrated ads, but New York is still the most taxed, most regulated, least economically free state in the Nation.

Sixty years ago, we had 45 seats in Congress. Today, we have 27, and our unemployment rate is nearly a full point above the national rate. Many upstate counties have unemployment rates of over 10%.

Posted by David Laska on April 3, 2013

Congress is on spring break through the end of the week, having balanced our budget, ended partisan bickering once and for all and forged compromise to solve all of our Nation’s problems.

Okay, only the part about “spring break” is true.

But with Congress out of the way and a quarter of 2013 already in the books, it’s a good time to take a look at the mood of our Nation. And with spring finally in the air, you might think that the national mood is ticking up. You’d be wrong.

Posted by David Laska on March 7, 2013

We’ve all acknowledged that we’re living in the era of the permanent campaign, but the general public is just catching onto the fact that, for Barack Obama, campaigning is the default setting.

Over the past several weeks, Obama has devoted his energy less to negotiating with House Republicans than to casting them as stubborn trolls bent on destroying the Nation via the sequester, a measure that Obama proposed in the first place.

Posted by David Laska on February 21, 2013

During his State of the Union address, the President proposed raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $9.00 an hour.

Like so many of his economic proposals – stimulus spending, healthcare for all, tax the rich! – a minimum wage increase is great politics for Obama, but terrible policy for Americans.

It’s simple math: a higher minimum wage means a higher hiring cost for businesses, and a higher hiring cost means fewer jobs. The unintended consequence of employment reductions is very real, and felt most by those with the least amount of education and experience.

Posted by Dominic Carter on December 1, 2012
Capitol Hill

If you’re like most Americans, you’re inundated with the obligations of day-to-day life. You have probably heard only in passing, the dire warning on your local TV newscast, "Washington gets closer to going over Fiscal Cliff." Sadly, such government paralysis has become routine, Washington is so polarized that less than a month after the Presidential Election, it seems elected officials are in the same situation of getting nothing done.

Have you noticed yet that just about every political decision from Washington these days comes down to the very end, scaring the American People about repercussions? Will unemployment benefits run out for those barely surviving? Are cuts to Medicare looming for seniors? Will you soon lose the Mortgage Interest deduction on your taxes?

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